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Redistricting 2011

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Frequently Asked Questions

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What is Redistricting?
What is the County of San Diego role in redistricting?
What difference does County redistricting make to residents of the region?
How has the County prepared for redistricting?
What is the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC)?
Is the County Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) an independent body that will make redistricting decisions?
Do County residents have a voice in redistricting?
Who are the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) members?
What are the duties of the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC)?
When and where are the RAC meetings?
Can members of the public attend the Redistricting Advisory Committee meetings?
Can members of the public submit suggestions or plans for consideration?
When will census figures be released?
Which Supervisorial districts will be most affected?
What criteria and guidelines has the County established for redistricting?
When will the Board of Supervisors consider the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) proposed plans?
When does the Board of Supervisors intend to adopt a final redistricting plan?
Will the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) consider whether to change the number of supervisorial districts?
I have a question that is not answered here. Where can I get more information?

What is Redistricting?

Redistricting is the redrawing or adjusting of electoral district boundaries following the federal Census to account for population shifts and growth during the previous decade. The redistricting process is governed by the U.S. Constitution, State and federal law, and the San Diego County Charter.

What is the County of San Diego role in redistricting?

California Elections Code § 21500 requires the County Board of Supervisors to adjust the Supervisorial district boundaries every ten years following the federal Census so that the districts are as "nearly equal in population as may be" and comply with the Voting Rights Act. This year, the Board of Supervisors is required to redistrict the five Supervisorial districts using 2010 Census data. The County’s redistricting process will include broad opportunity for public review and input. 

What difference does County redistricting make to residents of the region?

Redistricting will determine the boundaries of San Diego County’s five Supervisor-represented districts, so everyone living in the County has a stake.  Any adjustments will determine the supervisorial district within which a citizen votes, beginning with the 2012 elections.  At the County, the redistricting task relates only to creating districts where residents will vote for individuals to represent them on the San Diego County Board of Supervisors. The County does not reapportion congressional seats, adjust other electoral district boundaries or allocate federal funding for local programs.

How has the County prepared for redistricting?

The Board of Supervisors appointed a Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) to study the changing of Supervisorial district boundaries and submit no more than three proposed redistricting plans for the Board’s consideration by June 28, 2011.  Regular public meetings are scheduled to receive input from residents of the region.  One meeting will be held in each of the five Supervisorial districts.

The County's website will offer residents a convenient way to review all aspects of the redistricting effort. The website will post the Redistricting Advisory Committee’s agendas and minutes, the County’s Criteria and Guidelines governing the redistricting process, maps, census data and other information for the public's use.

What is the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC)?

On January 25, 2011 (12), the Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution to establish a Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) pursuant to California Elections Code § 21505, which allows the Board of Supervisors to appoint a purely advisory redistricting committee, as follows:

§ 21505.  Committee to study changing of boundaries of supervisorial districts

The board may appoint a committee composed of residents of the county to study the matter of changing the boundaries of the supervisorial districts. The committee shall make its report to the board of its findings on the need for change of boundaries, and the recommended changes, within six months after the final population figures determined in each federal decennial census have been released, but in any event not later than August 1st of the year following the year in which the census is taken. Recommendations of the committee are advisory only.

Is the County Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) an independent body that will make redistricting decisions?

Ultimately, any changes to the boundaries of the five Supervisorial districts must be voted on by the Board of Supervisors.  Both California Elections Code § 21500 and Section 400.1 of the San Diego County Charter stipulate that the Board of Supervisors has the duty to adjust the boundaries of the districts following the federal census.  The Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) is an advisory body to the Board of Supervisors

Do County residents have a voice in redistricting?

Yes.  All members of the public are encouraged to share their views about County redistricting at any of the public meetings of the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC). There is one RAC meeting planned in each of the five Supervisorial districts and a series of meetings planned for the County Administration Center. The purpose of the meetings is for the Advisory Committee to receive broad public input on the redistricting process. Members of the public may submit their own proposed redistricting plans directly to the RAC.  Ultimately, the input from the meetings will help the RAC develop its redistricting plans to be submitted to and considered by   the Board of Supervisors.

Who are the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) members?

The Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) consists of five (5) members, one nominated by each member of the Board of Supervisors and appointed by the Board of Supervisors.  Each member is a resident and registered voter of the County.  Members of the RAC were appointed by the Board of Supervisors on February 9, 2011 (9) and include Michel Anderson (D4) , Adam Day (D5), Dennis Ridz (D3), Andrea Skorepa (D1), and Deanna Weeks (D2).

 

 

 

 

What are the duties of the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC)?

As stated in the Resolution to Establish a Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) adopted by the Board of Supervisors on January 25, 2011 (12), the RAC has the following duties and responsibilities:

1.      Review and analyze census data and proposed redistricting plans, taking into account legal requirements and the redistricting criteria established by the Board of Supervisors;

2.      Hold at least one public hearing in each of the five supervisorial districts to receive input from the public on proposed redistricting plans;

3.      Hold at least one public hearing to consider the Committee's proposed redistricting plan(s) before submission to the Board of Supervisors

4.      Prepare and submit to the Board of Supervisors on or before June 28, 2011 a report and recommendation on no more than three proposed redistricting plans; and

5.      Such other duties and responsibilities as may be assigned by the Board of Supervisors, including but not limited to additional review and analysis of proposed modifications to redistricting plans prior to adoption of the 2011 Redistricting Plan by the Board of Supervisors.

When and where are the RAC meetings?

RAC Meetings including Location, Time, Maps, Agendas, Minutes and more...

Calendar of all Redistricting events

Can members of the public attend the Redistricting Advisory Committee meetings?

Yes.  All meetings of the RAC are public meetings and are held in compliance with the Ralph M. Brown Act (the open meetings law).

Can members of the public submit suggestions or plans for consideration?

Yes.  Members of the public may submit proposed redistricting plans or suggestions to the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) for consideration. 

When will census figures be released?

Results of the 2010 federal Census are anticipated on or before April 1, 2011.

Which Supervisorial districts will be most affected?

Given that the 2010 Census results will most certainly show population changes in every Supervisorial district, all the districts will be affected. If boundary adjustments are made to any one district, it is likely that changes may occur in adjacent districts.

What criteria and guidelines has the County established for redistricting?

As adopted by the Board of Supervisors on January 25, 2011 (12), the 2011 Redistricting Criteria and Guidelines include:

Legal Standards

1.       The County of San Diego is divided into five legally apportioned districts. (San Diego County Charter Section 400.)

2.       The principal legal standard governing county supervisorial redistricting is the equal protection rule that requires supervisorial districts to be as nearly equal in total population as possible.  This requirement is based in federal law, as well as California Elections Code § 21500.

3.       The area of at least two supervisorial districts shall be as substantially outside the City of San Diego as the population will permit. (San Diego County Charter Section 400.1.)

4.       In creating district boundaries, the Board of Supervisors may give consideration to the following factors:  (a) topography; (b) geography; (c) cohesiveness, contiguity, integrity and compactness of territory; and (d) community of interests of the districts. (Elections Code § 21500.)

5.       District boundaries shall also comply with the federal Voting Rights Act, as amended.

6.       Elections Code § 21501 requires that redistricting be completed no later than November 1, 2011.  However, to provide the Registrar of Voters adequate lead time, while accounting for any unforeseen circumstances, and establish the new districts as far in advance as practicable of the 2012 statewide primary to the benefit of affected voters, it is the intent of the Board of Supervisors to adopt a redistricting plan no later than August 2011.

7.       The Board of Supervisors must hold at least one public hearing on any proposed redistricting plan prior to the public hearing at which the Board of Supervisors votes to approve or defeat the proposal. (Elections Code § 21500.1.)

Guidelines

1.       With the exception of the City of San Diego and to the extent possible, individual cities will not be divided between districts.

2.       Where possible, dividing census tracts will be avoided.

When will the Board of Supervisors consider the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) proposed plans?

The Board of Supervisors will hold two important meetings to consider proposed redistricting plans.   On June 28, 2011 the Board will hold a public hearing on the RAC’s proposed redistricting plans.  On July 12, 2011 the Board will consider and vote upon an ordinance adjusting Supervisorial district boundaries.  Both meetings will be held at 9:00 am in the Board of Supervisors Chambers, Room 310 of the County Administration Center at 1600 Pacific Highway, San Diego, CA, 92101.  All members of the public are welcome to attend either or both meetings.

When does the Board of Supervisors intend to adopt a final redistricting plan?

The Board intends to adopt its redistricting plan by ordinance no later than August 2011 to provide the Registrar of Voters adequate time to establish the new districts as far in advance of the 2012 statewide primary as possible, for the benefit of affected voters.

Will the Redistricting Advisory Committee (RAC) consider whether to change the number of supervisorial districts?

Section 400 of the San Diego County Charter requires that the County be divided into five (5) legally apportioned Supervisorial districts.  As such, the RAC must maintain the number of Supervisorial districts at five (5).

I have a question that is not answered here. Where can I get more information?

Contact us: redistricting2011@sdcounty.ca.gov